Tag Archives: Arduino

Arduino Tutorial 55: Measuring Distance With HC-SR04 Ultrasonic Sensor

This lesson builds on the work done in Lessons 53 and 55. In this lesson we use the Ultrasonic Sensor to build a distance sensor. The HC-SR04 ultrasonic sensor can be programmed to send out a ping, and then measure the time it takes to hear the echo of the ping come back, after bouncing off a target. Knowing the speed of sound allows us to calculate distance to the sensor.

The circuit uses the following Schematic:

HC-SR04-Schematic
Schematic for Connecting the HC-SR04 to an Arduino

This is the code we develop in the video

The sensor is part of our Elegoo Kit , so if you get this kit, you will be using the same hardware we are using. This project builds on the work we did in Lesson 53.

For this build we will be using an Arduino Nano, which allows the project to be built on a single breadboard. You can use the Arduino Uno if you do not have a Nano, and things will work out the same. The build neatness is also facilitated by using small straight jumper wires, which you can get HERE.

Arduino Tutorial 54: Measuring Speed of Sound With HC-SR04 Sensor

HC-SR04
This is our HC-SR04 Ultrasonic Sensor Connected to our Arduino Nano.

In this lesson we explore use of the HC-SR04 sensor to measure the speed of sound. The hookup and programming are pretty simple. The Elegoo Kit includes this sensor, so if you have the kit, you will be using the same hardware we are using. This project builds on the work we did in Lesson 53.

For this build we will be using an Arduino Nano, which allows the project to be built on a single breadboard. This allows cleaner build, and one less likely to have problems from intermittent  connections. The build neatness is also facilitated by using small straight jumper wires, which you can get HERE.

You can connect the sensor up according to this schematic:

HC-SR04-Schematic
Schematic for Connecting the HC-SR04 to an Arduino

The connection pins are the same when connecting to a Nano.

The video below explains how to measure speed of sound from data coming from this sensor.

Code used in Today’s Lesson:

 

Arduino Tutorial 51: DHT11 Temperature and Humidity Sensor with LCD Display

DHT11
This shows our completed build with an Arduino Nano, LCD and DHT11 Sensor

In this lesson we work towards a stand alone Temperature and Humidity project using the DHT11 sensor.

This video will take you through the build and coding step-by-step, and the schematics below will help you follow along at home.

Our goal in this lesson is to add an LCD to the project. In lesson 50, we got the sensor working, and here we want to get the LCD connected. We are working with components from the Elegoo kit, which you can get HERE. In addition, your build can be much neater, cleaner and more stable is you use an arduino nano, instead of the standard arduino uno. The nano is small, and has male pins that allow it to be plugged directly into the breadboard, as seen above. I strongly suggest picking up an Arduino Nano, which you can get HERE. This lesson follows on to the work done in lesson 50. To recap, the DHT11 is connected as follows:

DHT11 Sensor
Connection schematic for the DHT11 Temperature Sensor.

You will also need to add the LCD, using the following schematic:

Arduino LCD Schematic
This schematic will allow you to connect the LCD to the

In my photograph at the top of the post, you can see it is important to keep the build neat, as there are lots of connections which must be made. Neat work is facilitated is you use short jumper wires, instead of the big male to male wires. You can get a jumper wire set that will keep your work neat HERE.  I am not trying to sell you a bunch of junk, but as projects get more complicated, you really need to use the short straight wires, or your build will become a rat’s nest.

We develop the code in the video in detail, but you can get the finished code down below.

 

 

Arduino Tutorial 50: How to Connect and Use the DHT11 Temperature and Humidity Sensor

In this lesson we show how to measure Temperature and Humidityusing the DHT11 sensor. This is a relatively simple sensor to use, but you will have to download and install a library. In our earlier lessons, we have used libraries before, but this is the first time you will have to download a library. The library I used was downloaded from HERE. The video explains in detail how to install the library, but in a nutshell you download the library from clicking the link on that page. Then you need to open the downloaded zip file, and then drag and drop the contents of the zip file to your desktop. Next you must determine where your arduino library folder is. You can do that by going to the arduino IDE, and under “file” select preferences. This will show you your “Sketchbook Location”, and that folder will contain your libraries folder. The folder you dragged and dropped onto your desktop should be dragged and dropped now into this library folder. The video shows you how to do this if this description is not clear. Now you will need to connect the sensor, according to this schematic:

DHT11 Sensor
Connection schematic for the DHT11 Temperature Sensor.

The video develops the code to use this sensor step-by-step, but the code is included below for your convenience.